Last update, February 22, 2021

Works and projects_




Project
2020—December

Series of collages made out of two Colombian print archives, sheets form Gráficas Molinari, a popular printshop founded in Cali in 1952, and ads from Diners Magazine (1976-1994), a cultural publication related to the Diners Club International credit card franchise, and its homonym art gallery in Bogotá (1980-2002). These hybrid images help to explore the limits between the bourgeois and aspirational esthetics of the magazine ads with the kitsch and corny look of the Molinari prints. This relates to a more general issue about class stereotypes in Colombian society and how artists tend to work and play in the intersection of both worlds.

See full project at: www.clubcomensalesmolinari.com

Virtual residency at Gráficas Molinari

Exhibition based on a road trip I did in June 2019, from Chicago (starting at the main entrance of the Art Institute) to the Santa Monica Pier in Los Angeles, following the mythical and forgotten Route 66. This cult adventure, half sentimental and half anachronistic, which lasted 25 days and implied 6000 miles of driving, meant for me the end of a cycle that encompasses artistic, personal, ideological, and cultural processes. The show consists of a double installation in which, besides the autobiographical note, two contrasting views of the United States are mirrored. On the one hand, the idealization of travel, road aesthetics, landscapes, sunsets, advertisements, cars, and gas stations; and on the other, a culture in decline, between sad and melancholic, that is well represented in the motel rooms with cigarettes smell and in the life of all the people forgotten by the system. Metaphorically, this duality also represents much of who we are, facades versus interior ghosts.

Solo exhibition at 12:00 Gallery


This playful exercise is the way that we found with Juliana Góngora to start a dialogue and imagine possible routes of collaboration between their works. The setting for this meeting is a game that follows arbitrary instructions, such as randomly choosing a product from a food dispenser. Then, they choose the image of the turtle to open new paths of thought and unexpected drifts in their processes: thinking materially about its shell –which is an exposed bone that is formed from the spine outwards, but looks like a stone–, in the relativity of time, the idea of movement, among others. Do more weight and less speed implies a lighter body?

Project with Juliana Góngora, Artbo fin de semana

Work
2020—June
Mesh was the name that Tim Berners Lee gave, in 1989, to what we know today as the World Wide Web or World Computer Network. In the original document, titled Information Management: A Proposal, he explained that it was important to use a hyperlink system similar to mind maps, with circles (nodes) and arrows (links), instead of tables or hierarchical systems. So first, I used this prefix, exactly as we see it in browsers, to point out my interest in cognitive processes such as enumeration, comparison, and association of information, which is the origin of thought of this computer system. Secondly, because it contradicts the notion of a flag in the sense that they demarcate territories, while the very essence of www is the free and infinite possibilities of navigation. Finally, there is an intention to point out the dystopian reality due to the pandemic, in which most of our social interactions happen precisely through "the web".

Foro Space, Four Flags Project

Instagram, vimeo
Bogotá––Chicago