Last update, April 13, 2021
Exhibition based on a road trip I did in June 2019, from Chicago (starting at the main entrance of the Art Institute) to the Santa Monica Pier in Los Angeles, following the mythical and forgotten Route 66. This cult adventure, half sentimental and half anachronistic, which lasted 25 days and implied 6000 miles of driving, meant for me the end of a cycle that encompasses artistic, personal, ideological, and cultural processes. The show consists of a double installation in which, besides the autobiographical note, two contrasting views of the United States are mirrored. On the one hand, the idealization of travel, road aesthetics, landscapes, sunsets, advertisements, cars, and gas stations; and on the other, a culture in decline, between sad and melancholic, that is well represented in the motel rooms with cigarettes smell and in the life of all the people forgotten by the system. Metaphorically, this duality also represents much of who we are, facades versus interior ghosts.

Solo exhibition at 12:00 Gallery

Duo Show
2019—October
Collaboration with the artist WooJin Shin across the chasm of time and space between Chicago, IL and Bogotá, Colombia. Our discussion first focused on the desert, but this line was dry. An oasis, perhaps, but this thought drowned in its overtness. In between the desert and the oasis we found relief from the concrete. We conjure and spy what seems like material certainty, but such sureness quickly revealed itself to be a mere illusion. Alas, we came to the fabled, desert mirage, and in this shifting and unstable site, found the ideal environment to codify our exhibition. Here, our artistic practices seek to root themselves in the pursuit of higher notions, even as we undermine these potential and ideal realities. Mirage appears to be an exhibition of paintings, videos, and on-site interventions. Upon approach, these discrete practices merge, recede, and give way to collective searching and uncertainty.

Project with WooJin Shin, 4th Ward Project Space

Project / Duo Show
2019—September
This project started as a dialogue with the pictorial work of the Antioquian artist Alvaro Marín, who has been exploring the geometric figure of the square throughout abstract paintings, since the early '70s. For this, I did 4 works (or sides of the problem). Two cylinders that depending on the angle can be viewed as a circle or a square, which is a diagram used to explain that light –essential for painting– can be at the same time a wave or a particle. A series of photographs from Nancy Holt's sculptures Sun tunnels –that reminded the previous cylinders– but also digitally threatened to explain the passage from the analogic grain of the photographic paper to the pixels of the screen. A wood structure simulating a rotatory door (once again recalling the cylinder) made out of modular canvases and, finally, a broken painting referencing the idea of flatland and a granite floor. All the pieces challenge the association and historic relationship between the square and its opposite, the circle.

Project with Alvaro Marín, Lokkus gallery
Woodwork: Juglans & Regia

Project
2018—September > November
Based on the homonym short poem of Emily Dickinson, from the book The Gorgeous Nothings: Envelope Poems, this project is a visual version on behalf of silence or the aura of everydayness. It is also a look at a 90's color palette, an awkward look at middle-class interiors, the journey of an artist in a small space, a metaphor for cooking, a timeline, the invisible presence of a body, a light experiment and, mainly, a state of mind, a push and pulls between the materiality and the immateriality of thought.

SAIC

Project
2018—August
This project takes its title from a personal anecdote around a travel to Uyuni, a small town in south Bolivia, which is the point of entrance to a natural park that includes the largest salt desert of the world, as well as other particular landscape sights: red lagoons, an island of cactuses, sand dunes, gigantic plains and rocks in form of trees. The dilemma, or thought experiment, in this case, has to do with the impossibility to recreate a specific moment from that trip, let’s call it a sublime moment, and try to record the whole experience in my brain. Now I wonder, is it possible to address a memory just by thinking of it, or by thinking in similar memories? Can that memory can be as powerful as the original experience? Can it be better, different, worst, more unique? Can those questions be transformed into visual problems for an audience that doesn’t have anything to do with that story or context?

Within Receding Horizons, Sullivan galleries (SAIC)

Instagram, vimeo
Bogotá––Chicago